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Using Science to Model the Tour de France

We take a complicated and seemingly intractable event like the Tour de France, model the terrain, apply the laws of physics, and then predict the winning time for each of the 21 stages. We learn how cyclists improve their power outputs and how manufacturers improve bicycle design. Students model the Tour de France with John Eric Goff at the University of Lynchburg early on, sometimes after just one year of university study.

 

iBeam Materials – LEDs on Metal technology

iBeam Materials have developed a radically new way to make GaN-based LEDs. Instead of using single crystal wafers of sapphire as substrates, InGaN LEDs can now be made on large-area flexible metal foils and eventually in a roll-to-roll process. iBeam is seeking to develop new applications of this technology in lighting and for microLED displays.

 

The BETTER approach to preventing chronic diseases

The BETTER approach to preventing chronic diseases harnesses high level evidence-based strategies, resources, and tools. BETTER focuses on those chronic diseases showing strong evidence that prevention and screening improves outcomes. Using a collaborative approach, BETTER provides a framework for a paradigm shift from fragmented disease-specific management to a proactive, personalised, comprehensive approach that engages patients as active participants in their own health.

Fera in Focus: A Complete History

Just like humans, plants have an immune system that they use to fend off pathogens and pests. Research involving plant immunity was guided by Harold Flor’s influential “gene-for-gene” model but this model is now supplanted by a more complex view of pant immunity. Disease resistance genes appear to work together in intricate networks that enable plants to detect and resist parasites more effectively. An in-depth understanding of the immune system can help us breed disease resistant crops.

 

World Cup Soccer Research at the University of Lynchburg

Professor John Eric Goff of the University of Lynchburg engages in a variety of research on soccer balls with his colleagues in Japan and England. This animation highlights published work Professor Goff has performed with his Japanese colleagues on World Cup soccer balls, including this year’s Telstar 18. Professor Goff uses wind-tunnel data from his Japanese colleagues to simulate a myriad of soccer kicks, which allows for comparisons between various World Cup balls.

Plants have an immune system… and it’s complicated

Just like humans, plants have an immune system that they use to fend off pathogens and pests. Research involving plant immunity was guided by Harold Flor’s influential “gene-for-gene” model but this model is now supplanted by a more complex view of pant immunity. Disease resistance genes appear to work together in intricate networks that enable plants to detect and resist parasites more effectively. An in-depth understanding of the immune system can help us breed disease resistant crops.

 

Investigating how two related proteins influence human disease

Dr Leslie Sutherland’s lab at Health Sciences North Research Institute studies a particular family of RNA binding proteins. Using next-generation sequencing techniques, Dr Julie Loiselle, a PhD student in the Sutherland lab, was able to reveal novel functions for these proteins, as well as identify new regulatory mechanisms which may influence how these proteins contribute to human developmental diseases and cancer.

Tackling threats which are a major concern and challenge to the fruit industry

At Fera, a state of the art research laboratory based in York, Dr Audsley and colleagues have been investigating means to control a fruit fly, an invasive pest which is causing major damage to fruits such as strawberries and cherries.

Impaired Theory of Mind in very preterm birth

Dr Margot Taylor’s research utilises innovative brain imaging technology, such as magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and MRI to understand the neural bases of cognitive development.

Safe Doors, Safe Homes – Evaluating Home-Based Safety Measures for Female Survivors of IPV

Stroud Beresford Group is run by a team of volunteer trustees and paid staff team.  We fundraise and apply for grant funding to provide our services.  We are also supported by a team of members of our local community who raise funds on our behalf as the ‘Friends of Stroud Beresford Group’.

eWind Solutions – Working towards bringing affordable airborne wind energy to rural communities

eWind Solutions seek to revolutionise the renewable energy market. Through their Tethered Energy Drone (T.E.D) portable technology, higher winds can now be targeted to generate energy at four times the rate of traditional wind turbines or residential solar panels.

Dr Christine Wekerle – CSA

Looking to create an engaging video which showcased her work to a wider audience, Dr Wekerle at McMaster University approached us at Sci Ani to see what we could do. She wanted to use the video as an entry for the IHDCYH Talks competition in Canada, run by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). After being a runner up in last year’s competition, she was hoping to go the extra step and win with this year’s entry.

Center For Network Systems Biology – CNSB

The Center for Network Systems Biology at Boston University supports ambitious research initiatives to map these protein interaction networks in different biomedical contexts to address this critical knowledge gap. CNSB provides the essential interdisciplinary knowledge as well as the technical prowess to get to the heart of network systems biology. With research programs based across both Boston University campuses – BU Medical Center and Charles River – the center offers a leading hub from which to chart the molecular networks of cells and tissues.

Is there an alternative to fossil fuels?

Green Biologics are a renewable chemicals company who are not only changing the face of renewable chemicals, but are changing the world while they are at it. Dr Liz Jenkinson is one of the lead researchers at the company, and it is her work that is providing the answer to the question: is there an alternative to fossil fuels? Her work proves that the answer is yes, and that it only relies on three key components – bacteria, genetic engineering and sugar.

A technology based future for psychotheraphy

Professor Namkee Choi from the University of Texas has been investigating how video conferencing can be used to deliver cost-effective mental health care for low-income homebound older adults suffering from depression.

High precision dose monitoring can enhance targeted tumour therapy

Proton beam therapy offers the potential to treat cancerous tumours without damaging the surrounding tissue. Dr Steven Vigdor, Professor Emeritus of Physics at Indiana University, hopes that his new venture, Phenix Medical LLC, will bring this technology closer to the patients it can benefit.

The ‘intelligent’ human immune system can respond naturally to fight cancer

Dr Xuemei Zhong, PhD, is Assistant Professor of Medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine, in the Haematology and Oncology section of the department. Her research looks at how the ‘intelligent’ human immune system can be stimulated to fight diseases like cancer without reliance on high doses of drugs and short-lived therapies, with a particular focus on a process called immunosurveillance.

An innovative, nutrition-based approach to managing kidney stones

The biotechnology company Captozyme is spearheading an innovative approach to nutrition to prevent the formation of painful kidney stones and other complications arising from the absorption of calcium oxalate from food. The company’s research efforts are led by Dr Qing-Shan Li, co-founder and CSO of the company.

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